&ldquoAs Alsop faced the cellos and drew from them the most tremendously shaped phrases with every inflection of her baton, you were aware of being in the presence of greatness.&rdquo
Musicomh.com

Brahms: Symphony No. 1

London Philharmonic Orchestra

Naxos 8.557428
Buy now on iTunes

The first in Marin Alsop’s bargain-priced series of Brahms symphonies proves that she is as capable as anyone of getting an orchestra to play this muscular music with real power.

Stephen Pettitt, THE Sunday Times (UK) ‘The Best of 2005” 3 December, 2005

3rd December 2005

Sharp-profiled rhythms, clean-cut textures and neat phrasing, combine to
keep the music moving forwards at all times. As a result, even if she does explore every emotional depth, Alsop manages to avoid portentousness in the First Symphony, a work that can easily become overbearing, while both the overtures have a sturdy athleticism. Exuberant in the Academic Festival Overture, starkly dramatic in the Tragic, the orchestral playing is consistently first class.

Andrew Clements, The Guardian (UK)

6th March 2005

Marin Alsop makes a welcome return to the traditional European repertoire with the launch of a complete cycle of Brahms’s symphonies… and it gets off to a very promising start with this sweeping, richly-detailed account of the first symphony, its majestic themes expansively realised, the composer’s inner angst never far beneath the surface. With the Academic Festival and Tragic overtures thrown in as a welcome bonus, this is the start of a series that should prove well worth collecting.

Anthony Holden, The Observer (UK)

6th March 2005

Alsop’s approach to this work is lyrical and passionate … a substantial success ..

MUSICWEB INTERNATIONAL, RECORDING OF THE MONTH

 6th February 2005

 


These are deft, spirited performances that bring out the grandeur of the music but also its complexities and inner voices. Brava.

MELINDA BARGREEN, THE SEATTLE TIMES (USA)

6th March 2005

Marin Alsop appears to be an excellent Brahms conductor. She begins the First Symphony with an imposing introduction that would have made Klemperer sit up and take notice: it’s that grand and imposing.

DAVID HURWITZ, CLASSICSTODAY.COM

5th February 2005